Dowsers.net

Discover and learn about dowsing

Paul Craddock ©  Copyright  2014      mail@healthyandwise.co.uk

AN INTRODUCTION TO DOWSING

A FREE SHORT COURSE

By Paul Craddock  


Dowsing is a practical skill using your body's own reflexes to interpret the world around you, using a dowsing instrument such as a pendulum or angle rods to amplify your body's small muscular responses to influences around you. These responses are so small that we would not notice them if we did not use an instrument. It is not scientifically possible to explain dowsing, suffice to say that dowsing has been practiced for many thousands of years and it works! We can say however, that dowsing involves communication between your conscious and subconscious mind, so the state of your mind when dowsing is important.

This course has been written for the person who has no previous experience of dowsing and is designed to give you a basic introduction to the world of dowsing. After you have gone through the basic introduction to dowsing you may decide to progress further, the application of dowsing is practically limitless, you can do such things as locate lost possessions and missing persons, find underground pipes, find water and minerals underground, pinpoint illnesses and allergies and even predict the weather.  By the end of this course you should at the very least be able to locate underground water pipes and work out their depths- dowsing is a practical skill just like learning to ride a bike, the more you practice the better you get!

There is no right way or wrong way to dowse just the way that works best for you, there are many variations and if you feel uncomfortable with what you are instructed to do, try something else until you find an approach that feels right for you. But it is much easier at the beginning to pretend that there is just one right way to dowse. Since we must start somewhere.


Exercise 1: Make a Pair of Angle Rods

The traditional dowsing tool is, as you probably know the V shaped twig. But as this is difficult to use most dowsers to day use what we call angle rods also called L-rods, because of their L-shape.  To make a pair of L -rods you need two unused wire coat- hangers, and a pair of strong pliers. Hold one of the coat hangers upright with the long base facing down. On one side, just before the base starts to curve, cut with the pliers. You are now left with only one side connected to the hook. Cut the wire again about 2 inches away from the hook. Now pull down the shortest arm to make an "L” shape. Repeat this to make a second L-rod. See figure 1. As a guide the short arm (to be held when dowsing) should be about 6 inches and the long arm about 14 inches.

After you have cut and shaped your rods I suggest you use a file to smooth down the edges of your two rods as these can be sharp after you have cut them.

Exercise 2: How to hold the L-rods

Hold the shortest arm of each rod loosely in your clenched fist, with your thumb resting on top. So the rod passes over the finger you normally point with, and under your thumb. hold both your rods horizontal with the long part of each rod pointing away from you. The rods should be about 6 inches apart (depending on your physique) pointing directly in front of you, the rods should be pointing just below the horizontal if you hold them too low they will not respond easily, and if you hold them too high it will be hard to hold them still. Make sure that you're holding the rods so that they are able to move freely from left to right. With the rods now pointing directly in front of you, you are now in what we call the neutral position; the rods are in a state of neutral balance, and will thus amplify and make obvious any small movement of your wrists. See figure 2: Holding L-rods.

Exercise 3: L-rod responses

Still holding the rods in the horizontal position, about six inches apart. Rotate your wrists slightly to the left. Both rods will turn to the left. Now turn your wrists slightly to the right. Your rods will turn to the right. Turn your wrists inward. The rods will cross over. Turn your wrists outward both rods will move apart- Remember the rods should point just below the horizontal to get the easiest movement. See figure 2 again if you are unsure. Continue to practice to get familiar with the different movements.

What we're doing here is practicing the various moves your rods can make when you are using them to dowse. Your wrists only have to move very slightly for you to see a movement in your rods. As the rods amplify your wrist movement. In the next exercise you will be getting your rods to move in response to your command, as if they were moving by then selves.

Exercise 4: Subconscious Movement of Your Rods

Hold your rods so they are in a state of neutral balance as in Exercise 2 and figure 2: Holding L-rods. But this time do not look at or concentrate on your hands or arms, instead focus on the end of the rods and relax. Now imagine the rods moving to the left, now ask the rods to move to the left. Don't force them to move by consciously moving your wrist. Remember to keep focusing your attention on the tips of the rods and not your hands. Now ask them to move back to the centre (neutral position). Now ask them to move to the right. Now ask them to return to the centre. When they are in the centre ask them to cross over each other.

What we are doing here is very similar to learning to ride a bicycle if you think to much about what your feet are doing or whether you're balancing, you are likely to fall off. If you instead concentrate on where you are going and treat the bicycle as an extension of your self you are less likely to fall off. So we use the rods as an extension of our selves, and just as riding a bicycle becomes something we do automatically with out thinking, so will using the L-rods.

If you are having difficulty getting the rods to move of their own accord you are probably trying to hard. Don't try, just let it happen. When looking at the tip of your rods imagine you are talking to your household pet, and you are giving it instructions to move in the desired direction. It helps to get the rods to move if you move around a little as this tends to break any starting friction. Go over Exercise 4 until you begin to get the sense that the rods are moving of their own accord. If you are having difficulty you are trying to hard, just let it happen.

Your State Of Mind

I said at the beginning of this course that your state of mind is very important, and that dowsing involves communication between your subconscious and conscious mind. What we are looking for is a state of mind between the two. Your conscious mind can interfere with your dowsing and movement of your rods. We use our conscious mind to give the instructions then we switch it off and let our subconscious do the work. Like programming a computer then letting it get on with your instructions. After giving your rods their instructions you then switch to a "not trying" state of mind, and relax, which lets your subconscious mind take over.

Exercise 5: Starting To Dowse

Place a length of wood or similar marker such as a small pipe about a metre/ 2 feet across the floor and once again assume the neutral position with both rods pointing directly in front of you, (read Exercise 2 again if you are unsure if you are holding your rods correctly). Now look at the end of your rods and concentrate hard. Tell them they will cross over when your feet walk over the piece of wood, or marker, and in your mind, visualise this happening.


When you have concentrated and visualised your task for a few seconds, STOP. Put your task to the back of your mind. Your mind is like a computer; you have now programmed that computer so all you have to do now is simply remember what you have set out to do in the back of your mind. The only concentration you now require is to stop your mind wandering whilst you are walking waiting for them to cross over.  So now you have programmed your self for the task in hand and with that task now put to the back of our mind, make sure you are relaxed and slowly walk to wards the length wood or marker. They should cross over the marker when you walk over it. But, at first some people may find that the rods cross just before or just after the marker on the floor, this is to be expected. You will find after practice your rods will cross directly over the marker. Remember to walk slowly.

Exercise 6: Finding an Underground Pipe

In this exercise we are going to go out side and find an underground pipe, most likely a water pipe. Using what you have learned in the previous exercises. Go outside your house or building, and find an area where there is most likely to be under ground water pipes.  Once again assume the neutral position with both rods pointing directly in front of you. Now look at the end of your rods and concentrate hard. Tell them they will cross over when your feet walk over a pipe and in your mind visualise this happening.  When you have concentrated and visualised your task for a few seconds, STOP put your task to the back of your mind. Your mind is like a computer, you have now programmed that computer, so all you have to do now is simply remember what you have set out to do in the back of your mind. The only concentration you now require is to stop your mind wandering while you are looking for your pipe.


So now you have programmed your self for the task in hand and with that task now put to the back of our mind, and the rods in neutral position we are ready to go and find a pipe. Now walk slowly across the area you have chosen to look for the pipe, as you approach an under ground pipe your rods should slowly turn inwards towards each other, eventually crossing over each other as your feet pass over the Pipe. When they have crossed over you should be standing over the pipe. X marks the spot! Don’t forget there may be more than one pipe to find, so expect the rods to cross over a few times.


In this exercise we have set out to look for a specific change or discontinuity in the ground below us, caused by a pipe. We have not concerned our self with any thing else like the stones under our feet for example: we did this by programming our rods and our self to only respond to a pipe. When the rods responded to the pipe they crossed over because we had earlier programmed them to do this. If we had programmed them to open outwards when we crossed over the pipe they would have done this.


To learn more about dowsing with rods and all the other things you can find and do with them check out our Home Study and Classroom Dowsing for Beginners Course.

  


PENDULUM DOWSING

Now that you have a basic understanding of dowsing with L- rods we can move on to pendulum dowsing. Pendulum dowsing uses many of the principles you learned when using your L- rods to dowse. But, is more versatile in its applications. The main use of the pendulum is to give yes or no answers in response your questions.


Making A Pendulum

What is a pendulum? A pendulum is simply a weight on the end of a piece of string, making a simple device to make. First we must find a suitable weight to use that we can attach a piece of string to. You need a weight that will make your pendulum well balanced, something like a builders plumb-bob not a large bunch of keys- Visualise a pendulum in a large Grandfather clock and how perfectly is balanced.

I suggest that to start with, you go to a fishing tackle shop and buy a lead 'sinker fishing-weight weighing between half an ounce and two ounces, the sinker should be round or pear shaped with a hole through it to thread string or fishing line. You will find lightweight nylon fishing line may be easier to use than string.

Thread your string or nylon line through your weight making it secure at the end, so your weight is firmly held in place at the end of your string or nylon. The total length of your pendulum from bottom of the weight to the end of the string or line should be no more than 8 inches or 20cm





Holding the Pendulum

Hold the pendulum between your finger and thumb about half way down the string line, giving a total pendulum length of about 6 inches or 15cm. Now swing the pendulum gently, and adjust the length of the string/line until the least effort is required to move the pendulum. With the correct adjustment, after the initial effort to get the pendulum moving is given, no effort should be needed. You will find that the shorter the length of the pendulum, the quicker and more responsive it becomes.










The Movement of the Pendulum

For this exercise you will need to sit at a table with the following: A ruler, a sheet of A4 blank paper with a circle about five inches in diameter drawn on it, and your pendulum.  Hold your pendulum in the position you found best in the last exercise, place the ruler in a vertical position lying flat on the desk in front of you. Hold the pendulum over the centre or the ruler and ask it to follow the length of the ruler. You may need a little effort to get the pendulum moving, but after the initial effort you should need no effort at all. Now turn the ruler so it is horizontal to you, hold your pendulum in the centre of the ruler again and ask it to follow the ruler as it did when the ruler was in its vertical position. Again after the initial effort to get your pendulum moving you should need no effort.  


Now take away the ruler, hold your pendulum over the table and ask it to move backwards and forwards in a straight vertical line, then ask it to do the same from left to right. It will always help if you make the initial movement to get the pendulum moving, but after that no conscious effort should be given. Now place your sheet of paper with the circle drawn on it in front of you. Hold your pendulum over the centre of the circle, and ask it to follow the outline of the circle in a clockwise direction, make the initial effort to get the pendulum moving if you feel it will help. Now repeat in an anticlockwise direction.


Now take the paper away and ask your pendulum to rotate clockwise, then anticlockwise, just give it the initial push to get it moving, then it should move without you making any conscious effort.  Practice the various moves of the pendulum until you feel comfortable with them, just like you practiced the different moves of your angle rods at the beginning of this course.


The Yes and No Response

The main use of the pendulum is to give us a yes or a no answer in response to our question. So we need to know which movement of the pendulum means yes and which movement means no.  Remember how you gave instructions to your L-rods like you were talking to a household pet, well we treat our pendulum in a similar way. So when using your L-rods, look at your pendulum but instead of giving it an instruction you ask it a question. Concentrate on your question for a few seconds, then stop concentrating- Relax and let your pendulum respond. Keeping your question at the back of your mind while you are waiting for your pendulum to respond- the response the pendulum gives to yes or a no varies from person to person. So you need to find your own responses. Sit at your table again and write the word "YES" on one piece of paper, and the word "NO" on another piece of paper.


Hold your pendulum over the "YES" piece of paper and strongly visualise everything you associate with YES. Which should be everything positive and masculine. Now tell your pendulum to show you "YES", your pendulum should move in a way, which means yes. You may need to give it an initial push to overcome any starting fruition.


Now hold your pendulum over the "NO" piece of paper and strongly visualise everything you associate with NO. Which should be everything negative and feminine. Now tell your pendulum to show you "NO", your pendulum should move in a way which means no. You may need to give it an initial push to overcome any starting friction. Your pendulum may rotate clockwise for “no” and anticlockwise for “yes”, or it may rotate for “yes” and move forward and backwards for “no”. It has a choice of four movements; clockwise, anticlockwise, vertical or horizontal. Its reaction to “yes” or “no” varies from person to person.

Unlike your L-rods you cannot TELL it which way to move. You must ask your pendulum to SHOW you.


Your pendulums response to “yes” or “no” may reverse from time to time. So if yesterday your response to “no” was a vertical movement, and your response to “yes” was a clockwise rotation. To day they may have reversed, so now a vertical movement means “yes”, and a clockwise movement means “no”. So every time, before you ask your pendulum a question say to it. “Show me yes”, it will then show you which movement means, “yes”. Do the same to find the “no response”  So every time before you dowse say to your pendulum: Show me yes. Show me no.  You can then proceed to ask your questions.


Starting friction

Your pendulums reactions can be speeded up by simply giving it a slight nudge by moving your hand or arm slightly, this will help break the starting friction when waiting to see how it responds to your questions or instructions


Dowsing With Your Pendulum

You now have the basic movements of your pendulum for dowsing: the YES, NO, response. We will now go over the steps for dowsing with your pendulum. Hold your pendulum as shown under the heading “holding your pendulum” above. If you are sitting down do not cross your legs. Clear your mind of any thoughts not concerned with your dowsing. Ask your pendulum to show you the “yes response” and the “no response”. (Remembering to help break the starting friction described above under the header starting friction). Concentrate hard on your question so it is clear in your mind exactly what you are asking. The question must be able to be answered with a “yes” or a “no”. After you have concentrated on your question and it is clear in your mind, put your question to the back of your mind and relax a little. The only concentration you now require is to stop your mind wandering while you are waiting for your pendulum to respond with a “yes” or “no” response.


Your pendulum should now slowly change from its slight wobble you gave it in your attempt to break the starting friction and change to a yes or a no movement. Giving you the answer to your question. This is the important stage where you must have the right balance of mind between trying and not trying, much like you learned when dowsing with your angle rods. Practice the above steps asking questions you know the answers to. Such as: is this wood? Is this water? . Is this milk, and so on but remember you can only ask questions that can be answered yes or no. If you asked is this wood or water? The answer you get would be meaningless.


You can ask your pendulum questions that can be answered with a yes or no about virtually anything, but be careful, decide first if it is appropriate to ask before you go ahead. Why not start by asking which foods in your cupboard or fridge are or bad or good for you?


I hope you have enjoyed this short free taster course. There is a lot more to learn about dowsing with your pendulum, and L-rods. Ask us about our dowsing for beginner’s British Society of Dowsers approved home study and classroom courses.


Best Wishes, Paul Craddock, Tutor. paul@healthyandwise.co.uk Phone 0844 576 3051 (UK)